European Week of Sport

Author: Nikola Benin

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Organisational Toolbox

The European Week of Sport organisational toolbox is designed to assist any actor in the European Union and beyond organise and participate in the European Week of Sport.The EWoS Organisational Toolbox comes from a project co-funded by the European Commission under the Erasmus + Sport Programme, led by TAFISA.

Full Project Partners Country Project Partner Website Belgium European Capitals and Cities of Sport Federation http://www.aceseurope.eu Federation of the European Sporting Goods Industry (FESI) http://www.fesi-sport.org France French National Olympic Committee (CNOSF) http://www.franceolympique.com Think Tank Sport & Citizenship http://www.sportetcitoyennete.org Germany The Association for International Sport for All (TAFISA) http://www.tafisa.net Greece Ministry of Culture, Education and Religion: General Secretariat of Sports http://www.culture.gr Netherlands Kenniscentrum Sport http://www.kenniscentrumsport.nl Poland Polish National Federation Sport for All http://www.federacja.com.pl/site2/ Portugal Portuguese Institute of Sport and Youth (IPDJ) http://www.ipdj.pt.

Purpose of this document This document is aimed at providing local stakeholders such as provinces, local government areas, municipalities, schools and non-profit organisations with the necessary tools and instruments to participate in and organise a programme or event as part of the EWoS. A successful European Week of Sport campaign must cascade both communication elements and inspiration to the citizens in their local territories. This document is therefore designed to help local stakeholders to organise events as part of the EWoS and ultimately make it accessible to a majority of European citizens. It provides generals tips and advice on how to engage communities and how to communicate and spread the word about the first-ever European wide initiative to inspire European citizens to #BeActive.

Link: http://ec.europa.eu/sport/week/resources_en.htm

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Gateway poll on multilingual classrooms

Author: Nikola Benin

School Education

Multilingual classrooms have become a reality in Europe, especially in big cities. It also includes children who grow up speaking dialects or regional languages at home and are confronted with the national standard language for the first time at school.

The poll is available in a choice of 23 languages and open until 26 September.

Link: https://ec.europa.eu/eusurvey/runner/multilingual-classrooms

Partners sought to complete the consortium.

Author: Nikola Benin

Project: “New notion of peak load and price discrimination on the electricity”

EE-08-2016.:Socio-economic research on consumer’s behaviour related to energy efficiencyLCE-21-2017.:Market uptake of renewable energy technologiesLCE-32-2016.:European Platform for energy-related Social Sciences and Humanities research.

Contact: nbenin@uni-ruse.bg

 

Info Day,”Cryptographie”

Author: Nikola Benin

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Les Points de contact national , vous invitent à un événement de réseautage européen dédié au sujet  sur le sujet H2020-DS-06-2017 “Cryptographie”.

5 septembre 2016 à Paris.

AGENDA 09:30 – 10:15 Welcome, registration, coffee, and networking 10:15 – 10:30 Cyber security PPP, Dr. Luigi Rebuffi, EOS 10:30 – 10:50 Presentation of current activities in cryptology and of the DS-06-2017 topic, Dr. Florent Frederix, DG CNCT 10:50 – 11:10 Automated proof techniques for cryptographic assurance, Dr. Bruno Blanchet, INRIA 11:10 – 11:30 Ultra-lightweight cryptology, Dr. Francois-Xavier Standaert, UC Louvain 11:30 – 11:50 Quantum safe cryptography, Dr. Jean-Charles Faugère, INRIA & Dr. Ludovic Perret UPMC 11:50 – 12:10 Quantum key distribution, Dr. Bruno Huttner, ID Quantique 12:10 – 12:30 Cryptography, Encryption and Big Data, Dr. Hoeteck Wee, ENS-Ulm, Paris 12:30 – 13:30 Networking Lunch 13:30 – 13:40 Presentations of the networks: IDEAL-IST & SEREN 3, Claire Ferté, Business France & Gabriella Quaranta, APRE 13:40 – 15:00 Participants’ presentations (2 minutes per presentation) A presentation will include your organization key figures, products, services, and competencies, and possibly your proposal suggestions 15:00 – 15:10 Short break 15:10 – 16:00 8 potential parallel working groups Each work group will elaborate informal proposal(s) 16:00 – 16:15 Q&A session and conclusion, Dr. Florent Frederix, DG CNCT.

Link: http://www.horizon2020.gouv.fr/cid104136/evenement-europeen-reseautage-sur-sujet-h2020-2017-cryptographie.html

INFO DAI, Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture

Author: Nikola Benin

h2020_globe_small

This event will inform you about funding opportunities for collaborative research projects within the EU framework programme Horizon 2020 area of “Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture”.

Please find here an overview of the research topics and funding schemes for the next “Food Security” Calls:

  • Sustainable Food Security SFS: Resilient and resource efficient value chains
  • Blue Growth BG: Demonstrating an ocean of opportunities
  • Rural Renaissance RUR: Fostering innovation and business opportunities
  • Bio-based innovation  BB: For sustainable goods and services. Supporting the development of a European Bio-economy.

Link: https://www.euresearch.ch/index.php?id=443&tx_seminars_pi1[showUid]=506&no_cache=1&user_id=44204&job_id=2299

Actions to bridge the divide in European health research and innovation

Author: Nikola Benin

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Topic identifier: CO-CREATION-08-2016-2017
Publication date: 14 October 2015

Types of action: RIA Research and Innovation action
DeadlineModel:
Planned opening date:
single-stage
04 October 2016
Deadline: 02 February 2017 17:00:00

Types of action: RIA Research and Innovation action
DeadlineModel:
Planned opening date:
single-stage
27 October 2015
Deadline: 04 February 2016 17:00:00

Time Zone : (Brussels time)

Horizon 2020H2020 website

Pillar: Societal Challenges
Work Programme Year: H2020-2016-2017
+ More

Topic Description

Specific Challenge:The growing attention given to research and innovation over the past decades has resulted in increased amounts of public funding being channelled to research and innovation, but also to a variety of policies and funding programmes being put in place in Europe, in order to maximise the quality and impact of this funding.

These policies have been wide in scope, ranging from basic research all the way up to supporting the market introduction of innovation and used a variety of instruments, oriented not only towards the production of knowledge and innovation, but also towards optimising the processes by which innovations are generated (including Co-Creation).

Investments in R&I must be smart and efficient and obtain the most value for every euro invested. This requires clear strategies for investing in R&I coupled with quality R&I programmes and strong institutions capable of implementing these programmes in close connection with the business sector and other stakeholders such as civil society. In addition, there is a clear need to improve the overall framework conditions for transforming R&I investments into tangible results, whether as new products or services or in terms of less tangible impacts such as improvements in the quality of life or inclusion.

The challenge for policy makers is to design policies and programmes with targeted funding to address well identified bottlenecks and which are adapted to the specific context of the research and innovation system in question. This is key to improving the efficiency of the European research and innovation system as a whole, as was stressed by the Commission in its Communication on ‘Research and innovation as sources of renewed growth’. [1]

Designing such policies and programmes requires a sound evidence base around the performance of research and innovation systems, the impact of research and innovation policies, the impact of research and innovation on economic growth, job creation and societal progress, and on the way in which public funding and policies can influence performance and impact. The Commission regularly publishes authoritative reports (e.g. the Innovation Union Scoreboard and the Innovation Union Competitiveness Report) which contribute to this evidence base, but given the increasing importance of research and innovation and recent evolutions in this field, the analysis regarding these issues needs to become more sophisticated.

Link: https://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/portal/desktop/en/opportunities/h2020/topics/co-creation-08-2016-2017.html

Better integration of evidence on the impact of research and innovation in policy making

Author:

Nikola Benin

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  Horizon 2020H2020 website

Pillar: Societal Challenges
Work Programme Year: H2020-2016-2017
+ More

Topic Description

Specific Challenge:The growing attention given to research and innovation over the past decades has resulted in increased amounts of public funding being channelled to research and innovation, but also to a variety of policies and funding programmes being put in place in Europe, in order to maximise the quality and impact of this funding.

These policies have been wide in scope, ranging from basic research all the way up to supporting the market introduction of innovation and used a variety of instruments, oriented not only towards the production of knowledge and innovation, but also towards optimising the processes by which innovations are generated (including Co-Creation).

Investments in R&I must be smart and efficient and obtain the most value for every euro invested. This requires clear strategies for investing in R&I coupled with quality R&I programmes and strong institutions capable of implementing these programmes in close connection with the business sector and other stakeholders such as civil society. In addition, there is a clear need to improve the overall framework conditions for transforming R&I investments into tangible results, whether as new products or services or in terms of less tangible impacts such as improvements in the quality of life or inclusion.

The challenge for policy makers is to design policies and programmes with targeted funding to address well identified bottlenecks and which are adapted to the specific context of the research and innovation system in question. This is key to improving the efficiency of the European research and innovation system as a whole, as was stressed by the Commission in its Communication on ‘Research and innovation as sources of renewed growth’. [1]

Designing such policies and programmes requires a sound evidence base around the performance of research and innovation systems, the impact of research and innovation policies, the impact of research and innovation on economic growth, job creation and societal progress, and on the way in which public funding and policies can influence performance and impact. The Commission regularly publishes authoritative reports (e.g. the Innovation Union Scoreboard and the Innovation Union Competitiveness Report) which contribute to this evidence base, but given the increasing importance of research and innovation and recent evolutions in this field, the analysis regarding these issues needs to become more sophisticated.

Link: https://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/portal/desktop/en/opportunities/h2020/topics/co-creation-08-2016-2017.html