Shifting global geopolitics and Europe’s preparedness for managing risks, mitigation actions and fostering peace

Nikola Benin

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Topic identifier: ENG-GLOBALLY-02-2017
Publication date: 14 October 2015

Types of action: RIA Research and Innovation action
DeadlineModel:
Planned opening date:
single-stage
04 October 2016
Deadline: 02 February 2017 17:00:00

Time Zone : (Brussels time)

Horizon 2020H2020 website

Pillar: Societal Challenges
Work Programme Year: H2020-2016-2017
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Topic Description

Specific Challenge:Europe’s strategic and geopolitical environment is evolving rapidly, will always be an area of change, and in a manner that increasingly raises concerns. In recent years, violent conflicts have agitated the planet, many of them located in Europe’s immediate neighbouring regions. These developments take place at a time when global geopolitics is undergoing long-term transformations challenging the traditional predominance of the West, while policies of economic austerity oblige EU Member States to manage scarce resources more effectively. These trends seriously challenge the Union’s capacity for guaranteeing its citizens’ security – one of its principal raisons d’être – while also jeopardizing its aspiration of promoting European values and interests abroad. In order to evaluate and promote its preparedness for playing its role as an effective security provider, to prevent escalation, to manage and understand risks and mitigation strategies for peace beyond its borders, the EU needs to understand the implications of recent global developments and assess them against its own capacities and willingness to make synergetic use of them.

Scope:The research to address this challenge should focus on one or two dimensions that have to be comprehensively addressed. The research may also cover other issues relevant for addressing the specific challenge.

1) Recent global geopolitical developments and their implications for the European Union

Research under this dimension should adopt a comprehensive understanding of security and explore uncertainty. Based on this, it should identify and investigate long-standing and novel – global and regional – external risks facing the EU and its Member States, in connection with ongoing initiatives and programmes for risk identification and early warning. Crises in its neighbourhood (in particular East Europe and the southern Mediterranean), such as the rise of radical Islamic groups exemplified by the expansion of the “Islamic State” in Syria and Iraq, but also conflicts and risks in other regions of the world such as in South Asia (e.g. Afghanistan) and Sub-Saharan Africa (e.g. Mali) should be examined. Research should identify the most pressing risks and areas of uncertainty and unravel the causes, expressions and security-relevant consequences of such instable contexts.

It should examine possible inter-linkages between various geographically limited conflict situations as well as their embeddedness into regional and overarching global geopolitical developments. This necessitates a sound understanding of the political, socioeconomic, cultural and military contexts in which patterns of insecurity and uncertainty emerge, also from a historical and philosophical perspective. An inventory of contemporary risks should form the basis for identifying their implications for Europe and its security needs. Research should examine how potential risks, mitigation strategies and opportunities are perceived, and how they can, do and even should become part of novel approaches and policies in the EU, its Member States and its partners in geostrategic matters. It should investigate how the EU, its Member States and other relevant partners can act to better anticipate, prevent and respond to the identified risks, mitigation strategies and opportunities, and develop scenarios on possible EU activities using a range of policy actions and instruments, including diplomatic, economic, civilian and, if needed, military means.

2) European Union’s preparedness for managing risks and opportunities, fostering peace in a crisis-ridden context

Research under this dimension should comprehensively examine the European Union’s and its Member States’ willingness, capacities, instruments and channels for anticipating and responding to a large array of external threats. It should contrast the EU’s legal basis for external security policies, including risk analysis and management, conflict prevention and resolution, post-conflict management and peace-building, to the actual practice, both prior to and after the onset of the economic and financial crises. Analyses should draw on comparative case studies from the EU’s handling of various conflicts and crises (including humanitarian ones) across the globe. Research should develop criteria for effective security cooperation in the EU, distinguishing between objectives and instruments, whether military or non-military, and contribute to the ongoing development of early-warning systems to identify emerging risks. It should also identify the political, socio-economic, technological and cultural conditions that enable or hinder the emergence of effective security cooperation in the EU. Based on this evidence, research should develop information sharing and decision support systems that facilitate cooperation, identify gaps and align the interests of diverse actors towards effective EU security policies, especially in the framework of its Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP). It should also provide insights on whether and how the EU can work synergistically together with individual third countries or international institutions like NATO.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the order of EUR 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:Research under this topic will lead to an up-to-date appraisal of global and regional risks and, as such, of Europe’s evolving security agenda in the light of recent geopolitical developments affecting its neighbouring regions (in particular East Europe and the southern Mediterranean), and the entire globe. It will generate critical and forward-looking evidence of Europe’s preparedness for effectively facing these threats, guaranteeing its citizens’ security while managing risks and fostering peace abroad. Based on this evidence, it will provide recommendations on how to improve the EU’s effectiveness as a domestic and global security provider.

Cross-cutting Priorities:Socio-economic science and humanities
International cooperation

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Topic conditions and documents

Please read carefully all provisions below before the preparation of your application.

  1. List of countries and applicable rules for funding: described in part A of the General Annexes of the General Work Programme.
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ENGAGING TOGETHER GLOBALLY

Nikola Benin

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Strengthening Europe’s position in the global context: science diplomacy and intercultural relations

Topic identifier: ENG-GLOBALLY-01-2017
Publication date: 14 October 2015

Types of action: RIA Research and Innovation action
DeadlineModel:
Planned opening date:
single-stage
04 October 2016
Deadline: 02 February 2017 17:00:00

Time Zone : (Brussels time)

Horizon 2020H2020 website

Pillar: Societal Challenges
Work Programme Year: H2020-2016-2017
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Topic Description

Specific Challenge:Europe is faced with numerous challenges that are increasingly global in nature and that have become of more immediate importance: peace and stability, migration, climate change, resource efficiency, health pandemics, etc. In many cases, responding to these challenges requires science-based evidence to inform decisions and joint international efforts that often include also scientific and technological cooperation. This is where science and diplomacy can join forces to form a ‘soft power’ tool in external policy – science diplomacy.

A main challenge is how to best link scientific expertise and cooperation with diplomacy and political influence to tackle major global challenges, promote knowledge and improve international relations. Science diplomacy has a particular added value in providing additional communication channels, particularly in stalemate situations and relations where few other mechanisms are feasible as well as on sensitive bilateral and multilateral issues. It promotes cooperation and conflict prevention, rebuilds trust and fosters shared understanding across countries, regions and cultures.

At the same time, the global context is characterised by competing understandings of central values and organising principles of society, including the meaning and direction of politics, economics, culture and ultimately human life. This context, and Europe’s place in it, needs to be better understood and accounted for, from both a contemporary and a historical perspective, if the European Union and its Member States want to continue to constructively take part and strengthen their position in global discourses about what constitutes a “good society” and to understand how European policy interventions have been understood and perceived globally.

Addressing this challenge requires a great dose of (self) reflexivity about European diplomacy, Europe’s own history and its interactions with third countries, regions, cultures and religions. It calls for a continued investment in fostering scientific, political, economic, social and cultural relations with other non-European global actors on all continents, and for ways in which to sustain scientific and intercultural exchanges that effectively enhance mutual understanding despite differences.

Scope:The research to address this challenge should in particular focus on the following key dimensions. It is expected to either comprehensively address one of these dimensions or to combine two or three of them. The research may also cover other issues relevant for addressing the specific challenge.

1) Using science in the context of European diplomacy

In an increasingly complex global context, diplomacy as a social practice and profession is undergoing considerable changes. In both bi- and multilateral contexts, it is no longer sufficient for diplomats to be skilled in the art of negotiation, but they also need to have the capacity – alongside specialist knowledge – to take better advantage of science and scientific cooperation.

How to better prepare and employ ‘science diplomats’ remains a particularly unexplored research area. The research efforts should focus on examining the interface between scientific advice and expertise and diplomats’ performance and capacity. It should analyse where science diplomacy can have the biggest impact and how it can be instrumental in strengthening EU capacities and strategic awareness and in establishing better mechanisms so as to anticipate events early and to swiftly identify common responses. This should involve ‘practitioners’ of science diplomacy.

Research should explore under which conditions science and scientific cooperation have contributed positively or negatively to reaching foreign policy objectives (peace, security, trade, development, humanitarian aid) in various challenging contexts and draw recommendations for the development of new actions at EU and Member States levels.

2) European culture, values and reflections of Europe’s colonial past in contemporary European societies

European values are to a large extent determinants of behaviour. As values stay behind many societal patterns and organising principles of society, the knowledge of the past development of European values as well as the knowledge of their contemporary status could help to understand many aspects of behaviour of contemporary European populations.

Multidisciplinary research associating scholars from the humanities and social sciences should adopt an outside-in perspective on contemporary European societies and trace the manifold non-European and European colonial era-related determinants of present-day societal and cultural diversity in Europe. In so doing, it should pay particular attention to the way societal and cultural influences from outside of Europe have historically been framed, contested, transformed, refused or taken up in European societies. It should elucidate how and why some of these influences were able to strongly impact European societies, values, activities and culture, and why others were less successful.

Research under this topic will lead to a sound understanding of the social, cultural, linguistic and political legacies of colonialism within Europe and globally. It will assess their implications for policy-making, EU values and intercultural and interlinguistic dialogue, including the construction of plural cultural identities in nations and countries of Europe.

3) Global trends of secularisation and religious radicalisation and the role of Europe

Over the centuries the relations between the state and religion were of key importance for the functioning of state and society. Today’s world is divided between secular states where government is officially separated from religion and states where this distinction is blurred, in addition to a few theocratic states. Whereas secular states are spread all over the world, and the religions professed and practiced by their citizens represent the widest possible spectrum of beliefs, the majority of countries which have embraced religion as their central norm are predominantly, although not exclusively, following Islam and are located in Africa, the Middle East, the Mediterranean region and Asia. A wide array of differences between official norms and practices still exist and should be taken into account in order to avoid undue generalisations between such countries and states.

Taking account of the diversity of forms of secularism and religion, and adopting a historical perspective, this multidisciplinary social sciences and humanities research should investigate and compare various types and experiences of the functioning of secular and religion-based states in and outside Europe. Its findings should clarify reasons for, and pathways of, transformation of the role of religion in state governance, and should explain differing perspectives of cultural and political co-existence within the polity. Specific attention should be paid to the analysis of the impact of religious radicalisation all over the world and its consequences on states’ peaceful coexistence as well as of the foreign fighter phenomenon. Research should also focus on what these trends mean in terms of internal and foreign policies for the European Union, its Member States and the state-religion relationships on the European continent. In this perspective, it could also include the possible forms of injustice, inequality and exclusion that may contribute to societal tension and marginalisation of certain minority groups, as well as the common elements between religion-based values system and secular systems that could help to counter radicalisation.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the order of EUR 2.5 million for each dimension would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:Research under this topic is expected to impact the foreign policies of the EU and its member states and provide enhanced coordination between them and between the EU and its international partners. It will provide in-depth insights into the multiple ties and mutual influences between Europe and its neighbours, former colonies and other countries and regions, especially in the scientific, socioeconomic, historical cultural and religious spheres. It will also provide a sound understanding of contemporary European societies, of the multiple sources and expressions of diversity in the EU and of how non-European influences impact on the formation of European identities. Acknowledging the multiple sources of today’s European diversity will have strong policy implications, not just for scientific and cultural policy, but also for immigration, integration, education and external policies. It will also facilitate Europe’s future engagement with third countries.

Cross-cutting Priorities:Socio-economic science and humanities
International cooperation

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Topic conditions and documents

Please read carefully all provisions below before the preparation of your application.

  1. List of countries and applicable rules for funding: described in part A of the General Annexes of the General Work Programme.
    Note also that a number of non-EU/non-Associated Countries that are not automatically eligible for funding have made specific provisions for making funding available for their participants in Horizon 2020 projects. See the information in the Online Manual.
  2. Eligibility and admissibility conditions: described in part B and C of the General Annexes of the General Work Programme

    Proposal page limits and layout: Please refer to Part B of the standard proposal template.

  3. Evaluation

    3.1  Evaluation criteria and procedure, scoring and threshold: described in part H of the General Annexes of the General Work Programme

    3.2 Specific evaluation procedure: At least 1 proposal per topic will be selected for funding provided it passes all evaluation thresholds.

    3.3 Submission and evaluation process: Guide to the submission and evaluation process

  4. Indicative timetable for evaluation and grant agreement:

    Information on the outcome of single-stage evaluation: maximum 5 months from the deadline for submission.
    Signature of grant agreements: maximum 8 months from the deadline for submission.

  5. Provisions, proposal templates and evaluation forms for the type(s) of action(s) under this topic:

    Research and Innovation Action:

    Specific provisions and funding rates
    Proposal templates are available after entering the submission tool below.
    Standard evaluation form
    H2020 General MGA -Multi-Beneficiary
    Annotated Grant Agreement

  6. Additional provisions:

    Horizon 2020 budget flexibility
    Classified information
    Technology readiness levels (TRL) – where a topic description refers to TRL, these definitions apply.
    Financial support to Third Parties – where a topic description foresees financial support to Third Parties, these provisions apply.

  7. Open access must be granted to all scientific publications resulting from Horizon 2020 actions.Where relevant, proposals should also provide information on how the participants will manage the research data generated and/or collected during the project, such as details on what types of data the project will generate, whether and how this data will be exploited or made accessible for verification and re-use, and how it will be curated and preserved.

    Open access to research data
    The Open Research Data Pilot has been extended to cover all Horizon 2020 topics for which the submission is opened on 26 July 2016 or later. Projects funded under this topic will therefore by default provide open access to the research data they generate, except if they decide to opt-out under the conditions described in annex L of the Work Programme. Projects can opt-out at any stage, that is both before and after the grant signature.

    Note that the evaluation phase proposals will not be evaluated more favourably because they plan to open or share their data, and will not be penalised for opting out.

    Open research data sharing applies to the data needed to validate the results presented in scientific publications. Additionally, projects can choose to make other data available open access and need to describe their approach in a Data Management Plan.

    – Projects need to create a Data Management Plan (DMP), except if they opt-out of making their research data open access. A first version of the DMP must be provided as an early deliverable within six months of the project and should be updated during the project as appropriate. The Commission already provides guidance documents, including a template for DMPs.

    – Eligibility of costs: costs related to data management and data sharing are eligible for reimbursement during the project duration.

    The legal requirements for projects participating in this pilot are in the article 29.3 of the Model Grant Agreement.

  8. Additional documents:

    H2020 Work Programme 2016-17: Introduction

    H2020 Work Programme 2016-17: Europe in a changing world – inclusive, innovative and reflective societies
    H2020 Work Programme 2016-17: Dissemination, Exploitation and Evaluation
    H2020 Work Programme 2016-17: General Annexes
    Legal basis: Horizon 2020 – Regulation of Establishment
    Legal basis: Horizon 2020 Rules for Participation
    Legal basis: Horizon 2020 Specific Programme
Submission Service

The submission system is planned to be opened on the date stated on the topic header.

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Get support

Subventions de projets associatifs dans le domaine de la jeunesse

Author: Nikola Benin

La Fédération Handicap International, l’Organisation Internationale du Travail et le Groupe Recherche Réalisation Développement Rural  (GRDR) viennent de lancer des appels à propositions dans le cadre du CODEVA (Contribution au DEVeloppement Associatif) en vue d’accorder des subventions à des associations qui activent dans le domaine de la jeunesse pour le financement de projets associatifs.

Le Programme d’Appui Jeunesse Emploi ‘‘PAJE’’ dont l’objectif général est de soutenir les réformes et l’action du gouvernement algérien dans sa politique nationale en direction de la jeunesse prévoit une enveloppe de contribution au développement associatif ‘‘CODEVA’’ permettant de financer, par le biais de subventions, des projets associatifs s’inscrivant dans les objectifs du programme, en direction des jeunes et en partenariat avec les institutions dans les wilayas pilotes de Annaba, Béchar, Khenchela et Oran.

Afin de soutenir des associations n’ayant pas suffisamment de compétences pour répondre à des appels à propositions de l’Union européenne qui nécessitent le respect de procédures administratives complexes, le Ministère du Travail de l’Emploi et de la Sécurité Sociale a signé un contrat avec trois organisations relais, à savoir, la Fédération Handicap International,  l’Organisation Internationale du Travail(OIT) et le GRDR qui à leurs tours vont subventionner des associations à travers des appels à propositions aux procédures plus souples (subventions dites en cascade).

Les lignes directrices à l’intention des associations ainsi que les pièces constitutives du dossier de demande sont téléchargeables comme suit:

Les dossiers de candidatures devront être envoyés à l’adresse indiquée dans chacun des appels à propositions. Tout envoi à destination des directions du PAJE (nationale et locales) ne sera pas recevable.

Preventing and combating violence against wome

Author: Nikola Benin

JUST/2016/RGEN/AG/VAWA

The deadline for this call for proposals is 27/10/2016 12:00 (noon) CET.

Documents for applicants

The Application Form and all mandatory templates for the Annexes can be downloaded fromPRIAMOS under the call reference JUST/2016/RGEN/AG/VAWA.

How to apply

Please apply using PRIAMOS, the DG Justice and Consumers grants management system.PRIAMOS allows applicants to register, to download application forms and to submit their applications.

Reporting of fraud and irregularities

Have you received any information on allegations of fraud, corruption, or other illegal activities involving money from the EU budget? Please do not stay silent and report it as soon as possible to the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF).

OLAF’s mission is to protect the financial interest of the European Union by fighting fraud affecting the EU budget, corruption and any other irregular activity, including misconduct within the European Institutions, in an independent manner.

Results of evaluation of this call

Proposals submitted are evaluated by the Commission after the expiry of the call deadline. The results of the evaluation will be published on DG Justice and Consumers website.

Factories of the Future Conference 2016

Author: Nikola Benin

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Materialising Factories 4.0

15-16 September 2016, Brussels

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On 15 and 16 September leading industrial and research experts will debate major priorities for the future of manufacturing in Europe at the Factories of the Future Conference 2016.

The conference is dedicated to the transformation of manufacturing across Europe. It will showcase the achievements of research and innovation projects that are revolutionising manufacturing in Europe under the EU’s €1.15 billion ‘Factories of the Future’ Public-Private partnership.

Factories of the Future Conference 2016 includes two pitching sessions. In these sessions participants in ‘Factories of the Future’ projects will have the opportunity to present briefly their results to potential business and innovation partners.

Further information

Related documentation

eseia Professional Training on Green Mobility and System Integration

Author: Nikola Benin

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12-13 September 2016, Brussels

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Take part in the eseia Professional Training on Green Mobility and System Integration and receive cutting-edge trainings from science and business form various disciplines. This training is organised in Brussels back to back with EU Mobility Week.

This two-day training provides an overview of state-of-the art technologies and future trends supporting Green Mobility. Participants get insights into vehicle and infrastructure related technologies and have the possibility to discuss and evaluate the concepts under consideration of different viewpoints.

Application deadline: 2 September 2016

 

 

Further information

“Interculturalità & Comunicazione”

Auotor: Nikola Benin

After this hot Italian summer the 3rd deadline of ERASMUS+ is approaching!

InCo – Molfetta has started to look for the future volunteers for our local activities and for a  partner organization with the deadline of 20th of August.

Available placements are listed below with some details about the activities:

Please read on for more information!

1) Associazione InCo – Molfetta from March 2017, our headquarter in Southern Italy, 1 vacancy.

2) CLAD from February 2017 a social center in the Municipality of Terlizzi, Southern Italy for 1 year 2 vacancies.